The International Information Center for Geotechnical Engineers

After an earthquake, there is a disturbance in the field of gravity that happens almost instantaneously. In a new study, scientists observe and model the gravity-related signals stemming from this disturbance, proposing their use as a rapid estimate of the magnitude of strong earthquakes.

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We invite you to provide feedback on this year's students of Michigan projects on "Geoenvironmental Engineering.

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More than 11 years after the Lusi mud volcano first erupted on the Indonesian island of Java, researchers have probably figured out why the mudflows haven't stopped: deep underground, Lusi is connected to a nearby volcanic system.

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The report makes a review of the tsunami hazards over the last 400 years and highlights "seismic gaps" or locations in the Pacific region where the tsunami threat might have been overlooked, due to long periods of seismic inactivity.

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A University of Washington research project simulates 50 ways a magnitude 9.0 earthquake on the Cascadia subduction zone could shake out in the northwest of the United States.

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A series of earthquakes between 2008 and 2010 in the Raton Basin - along the southern Colorado and northern New Mexico border – was likely due to fluids pumped underground during oil and gas wastewater disposal, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder.

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The international team of scientists just finished exploring the seabed of the Pacific Ocean, offshore Alaska and British Columbia, in an effort to understand better the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault system.

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